Tag: Goodreads

Book Review – The Ravens

  • Title: The Ravens
  • Author: Kass Morgan, Danielle Paige
  • Genre: Supernatural/Fantasy
  • Publisher: Alloy Entertainment, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Release Date: November 3, 2020
  • Picture Credit: Goodreads
  • Blurb: Kappa Rho Nu isn’t your average sorority. Their parties are notorious. Their fundraisers are known for being Westerly College’s most elaborate affairs. But beneath the veil of Greek life and prestige, the sisters of Kappu Rho Nu share a secret: they’re a coven of witches. For Vivi Deveraux, being one of Kappa Rho Nu’s Ravens means getting a chance to redefine herself. For Scarlett Winters, a bonafide Raven and daughter of a legacy Raven, pledge this year means living up to her mother’s impossible expectations of becoming Kappa Rho Nu’s next president. Scarlett knows she’d be the perfect candidate — that is, if she didn’t have one human-sized skeleton in her closet…. When Vivi and Scarlett are paired as big and little for initiation, they find themselves sinking into the sinister world of blood oaths and betrayals. (Blurb Credit: Goodreads)

I picked up The Ravens by Kass Morgan and Danielle Paige from Barnes and Noble as it was one of their YA Book Club books. The blurb pulled me in and the writing on the pages of the book kept me reading. I have always found books that take place in dorms or something similar. fascinating. The fact that this tale unravels inside the Kappa Rho Nu’s sorority house upped my interest.

The main characters, Vivi Devereaux and Scarlett Winter, belong to the exclusive sorority, Kappa Rho Nu, AKA: The Ravens. Each young lady holds a secret that can never be shared. Rumors have spread throughout the campus. Nobody can pin down exactly what happens inside the house; they just know strange things occur.

The story is written in third person. The point of view shifts between Scarlett and Vivi in separate chapters. Scarlett has known her destiny since birth. Vivi’s mom kept them hopping from town to town and tried her best to steer Vivi away from the past. These two were thrown together from the beginning in what would become an enemies-to-friends tale. Throw in a good dose of magic and a heaping pile of gore and the plot of the story is laid bare.

The Ravens kept me in suspense from the first page until the last. The writing is simplistic with a little too much telling and not enough showing. The story contained characters of all races, which is wonderful. The description of the different races might have been a little too simplistic for me. I enjoy reading character descriptions, such as “her flawless dark mocha skin” or “her face looked like peaches and cream” when discussing ethnicities. It paints a picture that I am likely to forget. The authors chose to use the words “black” and “white” to distinguish race. I will reiterate, I loved this story because of the multiple races interacting together, I only feel that there was a more beautiful way to describe the girls.

In conclusion, The Ravens is exciting and nail biting and full of suspense and gore that kept me reading. The simplistic writing kept the pages turning but disappointed me on another level. It is possible that I have an unpopular opinion on this piece of work. I’ve not read reviews but I have glanced at ratings and it seems it has a great share of 4 and 5 stars. I’m not able to rate it that high but it does come in at a respectable 3.5 with a recommendation to read if a sorority house of magical beings living out their destinies fascinates you.

Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter

Pretty Girls
Title: Pretty Girls
Author: Karin Slaughter (website)
Publication Date: September 29, 2015
Publisher: Williams Morrow
Genre: Adult Thriller
Source: Audible
Synopsis (Goodreads):

Twenty years ago Claire Scott’s eldest sister, Julia, went missing. No one knew where she went – no note, no body. It was a mystery that was never solved and it tore her family apart.

Now another girl has disappeared, with chilling echoes of the past. And it seems that she might not be the only one.

Claire is convinced Julia’s disappearance is linked.

But when she begins to learn the truth about her sister, she is confronted with a shocking discovery, and nothing will ever be the same…

My Thoughts: I went into this book not knowing what to expect. To say the craziness of this extended dysfunctional family was seemingly normal within their separate nuclear families would be pushing boundaries and shows a great deal of denial. One sister went missing, another covered her pain with booze and pills, and the last lived a lavish, kept-woman life. All oblivious to the danger surrounding them.

The novel is written from a limited third-person point of view. While I love audiobooks for convenience, sometimes shifts in POV happen when I’m in the midst of cleaning or driving and I miss the character shift. When a single narrator attempts to take on several characters, the subtle changes in tone can be imperceptible. This fallacy is something I bypassed with relative ease and continued to be fascinated by the story.

Thriller reviews are difficult for me because it’s so hard to avoid spoilers. This author is a master of ratcheting up the suspense just when you think you might catch up and get a grasp on the story.

World-building: Pretty Girls is a thriller. It is meant to keep the reader wrapt in suspense. The world-building in this novel proves to be a very complicated and intricate design. The descriptions caused me to shiver, shake, and squirm. Gore, violence, and sexual content added a sense of truth to this mystery. Karin Slaughter, the author, proved to be an expert sociopath… or, at least, she writes like one.

Character-building: My favorite aspect of this story was the complicated characters. Each had dramatically different lives with one common denominator–they were family. Over the course of my reading, I enjoyed watching them grow, and suffer, as individuals and reunite as a family.

Audiobook rating: 4 out of 5 stars.

Warning: This suspense novel delves into rape, drugs, and vulgar descriptions and vocabulary. I would suggest for mature reading only.

Outside of possible triggers, if you love dark suspense, Pretty Girls is the novel for you.

Buy Links:

Amazon     Audible     Barnes & Noble     Books-a-Million     IndieBound

The Girl the Sea Gave Back

the girl mv4Title: The Girl the Sea Gave Back
Author: Adrienne Young (Website)
Source: Amazon
Publish Date: September 3, 2019
Publisher: Wednesday Books
Genre: Young Adult Fantasy
Summary: Via Goodreads

For as long as she can remember, Tova has lived among the Svell, the people who found her washed ashore as a child and use her for her gift as a Truthtongue. Her own home and clan are long-faded memories, but the sacred symbols and staves inked over every inch of her skin mark her as one who can cast the rune stones and see into the future. She has found a fragile place among those who fear her, but when two clans to the east bury their age-old blood feud and join together as one, her world is dangerously close to collapse.

For the first time in generations, the leaders of the Svell are divided. Should they maintain peace or go to war with the allied clans to protect their newfound power? And when their chieftain looks to Tova to cast the stones, she sets into motion a series of events that will not only change the landscape of the mainland forever but will give her something she believed she could never have again—a home.

My take: While I enjoyed Tova’s story, I felt the book started slowly and it took me a few chapters to become invested in the characters. Point-of-views shifted between Tova and Halvard, each written in first-person. However, a few chapters were written in third-person and it proved a bit confusing.

 

Main Characters:

Tova: In the beginning, I found her annoying. She was found by the Svell after her mother believed her to be dead. Tova’s attachment and dependence upon Jorrund, the tribes Tala, felt codependent. She had great abilities, though she had never learned to hone them correctly. The saving grace for my ability to like her was the ability of the author to show fierce character progression.

Halvard: Strangely enough, I liked him immediately. His character was forced to mature quickly as he would come to lead his people at an early age.

 

Passages I loved:

          “The All Seer had seen what lay inside the heart of Vigdis and had come in warning. But the Svell didn’t know the language of the future the way I did. They didn’t understand that there was no such thing as a secret. The truth was everywhere. It was in everything. You only had to open your eyes to see it. The Spinners sat beneath the Tree of Uror, watching. Listening. Weaving away at the web of fate.” Zova, page 91

          “‘The stones? You don’t listen to the stones!’ I flung a hand toward the blood-soaked glade, my voice rising. ‘You want to believe that you can carve fate into a river that leads you where you want to go. It doesn’t work that way, Jorrund.'” Zova, Page 96

I love a story involving fate and destiny. I love the way characters embrace their own beliefs. This story is firmly defined by fate and there wasn’t much of a debate between fate and free-will, which I wished to see.

Overall, The Girl the Sea Gave Back interested me and held my attention. The world-building could have been better for a fantasy novel, in my opinion. The author’s writing, while there was a little too much telling, was concise without grammar or spelling errors.

 

Rating: 3.5

 

Buy links:     Amazon    Audible    Barnes and Noble     Kobo     GoogleBooks